Mastering the Moment with Coach Travis

Mastering the Moment with Coach Travis

Mastering the Moment with Coach Travis

Approach with familiarity. Minimize variables. Master the moment.

When you watch a high level basketball player approach a free throw shot and you notice that before every shot they always bounce the ball two times, take a deep breath, set position, then shoot, this is not an accident. This is on purpose. This is their routine that allows them to approach with familiarity, minimize variables, and master the moment.

When you see a high level baseball player step to plate and always begin by digging their front foot into the ground, then placing their back foot into position, then twisting their grip into the bat, taking 2 soft swings, then set their final position before the throw, this is not an accident. This is on purpose. This is their routine that allows them to approach with familiarity, minimize variables, and master the moment.

We can find this approach in all areas of athletics and even in life. When we create a routine we allow ourselves the opportunity to approach a difficult task with some familiarity. When we do that we are then minimizing variables that can potential stand in our way for success. 

When I start my day, I set my alarm a minimum of an hour and thirty minutes earlier then the moment I need to walk out the door. I do this because I consider each day a big task, and I want to approach a big task with some familiarity.

A day can be easy or hard, joyous or tragic, fun or boring. The unknown and the known of your day can also cause some degree of anxiety. That is why I make sure I start my day with the same routine no matter what. 

Let’s look at this from another angle. You wake up by mistake 10 minutes before the moment you need to walk out the door. You rush to brush your teeth, you grab the first articles of clothing you see. You run to the bathroom for a quick glance in the mirror. Grab your bag and rush out the door. How successful are you going to feel by the way you’ve entered into this day?

You are now beginning a big and potentially difficult task with a larger amount of anxiety. Not to mention, you forgot to feed the dog. You haven’t had your two cups of coffee. The clothes you are wearing stink. You forgot to bring your hat, and didn’t have time to brush your hair. You haven’t eaten and haven’t packed your lunch for the day. How miserable has this day begun in comparison?

Creating a routine and approaching with familiarity allows us to minimize these variables. Now, let’s take this concept with us into the gym.

When you are faced with a difficult task such as a 1-Rep Max Back Squat or your about to perform a high intensity CrossFit benchmark, a routine will allow you to approach these moments with familiarity.

A routine can be the way you approach your barbell before attempting your lift. A routine can also be how you warm up your body and prepare your mind for the task that is quickly approaching.

No matter what your routine is, it should be one that centers you and allows you to approach your task with some familiarity. You can copy and steal someones routine for a bit, but know that your true potential lives in a place that is within you, and in order to access that potential, you must be you.

Craft your own routine, and begin mastering your moment.